King of Compact Cameras ? Best Option for Beginners

Let’s outline the main points WHY it is so:

1. Comlicated functions made easy

The ZV-E10 features several great functions which are extremely useful for a creator. For example:

Bokeh switch

In bigger cameras you’d need to do several things in order to get the sweet bokeh (adjust the aperture, shutter speed). In ZV-E10 however this can be done with just one click of a button. So whenever you want to separate your subject from the background you can do it easily.

Product showcase

So usually cameras try to track and keep the focus on your face, but for a reviewer’s videos this is often an inconvenience because cameras don’t want to acknowledge that you are holding something important in front of it and focus on it. Well.. no more of that. With on click of a custom button the ZV E10 will know that it needs to shift focus from your face to an object held in front of your face. Like this:

2. E-Mount

This is huge…

For convenience and portability you can, of course, use the kit lens (16-50mm f/3.5-5.6). Buuuuuuuuuuuuut you can now mount on the ZV E10 something ridiculous like 100-400mm or a 24-70mm or anything with an E-Mount.

This is by no means a Pro level camera. It’s 24Mpix sensor will handle any E-mount lens without a doubt though, and it’s good to have such a variety of lenses available. Still… this camera is aimed (mostly) at folks who want to shoot something on the go or on a budget.

But wait, there are a few compact lenses by other brands that are also made for APS-C Sony cameras and they are quite affordable. Something like Sigma’s 30mm and 16mm lenses:

So anyway.. You have a choice now 🙂

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3. Other killer features

Like a capsule mic that records crisp and clean audio even outdoors (with a dead cat attached). Check out this sound comparison video by Sony to feel the difference:

Then there’s plug and play functionality that finally lets you use this camera as a webcam for your Zoom meetings or for a personal call or for Live streaming to Twitch or something. Quite useful.

And of course, there’s a tilty flippy screen. For that type of camera that is quite obvious and not that remarkable you might say, and yes you are correct. Personally I’m quite excited about it because I’m using Sony a7III which does not have this screen and I miss it… Big sad.

Still confused ?

I’ll help you make the right choice.

Want to buy a new camera or a lens ? I’ll be your virtual shopping assistant.

5 Camera Kits with Flippy Screens for Beginners

They are all interchangeable lens cameras, if you’d want to buy a new one. Aaaaand all those cameras are very compact and travel friendly 🙂

Canon EOS M200 with 15-45mm Lens

Price: $549 (on B&H)

Sensor: 24.1MP APS-C CMOS Sensor

Lens mount: Canon EF-M

Lens: 15-45mm (35mm Eq: 24-72mm) f/3.5-f/6.3

Max. video resolution: 4K (3840 x 2160) at 23.976p

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Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark IV with 14-42mm Lens

Price: $699 (on B&H)

Sensor: 20.3MP Micro Four Thirds Sensor

Lens mount: Micro Four Thirds

Lens: 14-42mm (35mm Eq.: 28-84mm) f/3.5-f/5.6

Max. video resolution: 4K (3840 x 2160) at 23.976p/25p/29.97p

Sony Alpha a6100 with 16-50mm Lens

Price: $848 (on B&H)

Sensor: 24.2MP APS-C Sensor

Lens mount: Sony E

Lens: 16-50mm OSS (35mm Eq.: 24-75mm) f/3.5-f/5.6

Max. video resolution: 4K (3840 x 2160) at 24.00p/25p/29.97p

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Canon EOS M50 Mark II with 15-45mm Lens

Price: $699 (on B&H)

Sensor: 24.1MP APS-C Sensor

Lens mount: Canon EF-M

Lens: 15-45mm (35mm Eq.: 24-72mm) f/3.5-f/6.3

Max. video resolution: 4K (3840 x 2160) at 23.976p

Sony Alpha a6400 with 16-50mm Lens

Price: $998 (on B&H)

Sensor: 24.2MP APS-C Sensor

Lens mount: Sony E

Lens: 16-50mm OSS (35mm Eq.: 24-75mm) f/3.5-f/5.6

Max. video resolution: 4K (3840 x 2160) at 24.00p/25p/29.97p


Still confused ?

I’ll help you make the right choice.

Want to buy a new camera or a lens ? I’ll be your virtual shopping assistant.

YouTuber ditched $10k setup for this compact camera


That’s a wonderful camera for a beginner who wants to shoot things mainly for social media. Camera’s build-in lens is a 24-70mm full frame equivalent with the lowest aperture of f/1.8 which gives super blurry backgrounds. And the most important part is – it is affordable ($648 on B&H).

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Before buying your first camera, answer these 3 questions.

Before buying your first camera, answer these 3 questions | nerd-tips.com Nerd Tips

This episode is also available as a blog post: http://nerd-tips.com/2021/06/15/before-buying-your-first-camera/ In this short episode we're going to cover 3 very important questions to ask yourself before buying your first camera. If you are a beginner photographer, stick around 😉

And we are starting right…now.

Question #1

What is the main purpose of your camera, and what it’s going to be used for ?

Is it casual photography ?.. or Pro photography ?… or maybe video (home videos or social media) ? or a little bit of everything ?

The answer to this question will help you choose one particular camera over another, because different cameras, believe it or not, excel at different things, like shooting video, for example.

Let’s say you need a camera to shoot short videos and take photos for social media. Then pay attention to its video shooting capabilities. But don’t go too far (you seriously don’t need a camera that shoots 4k at 120 fps).

But you’re gonna need to take some sweet pics too. The only thing I want to say here, is: don’t count pixels and megapixels. EVERY camera that is available on the market right now will do a great job at taking photos for social media. End of story.

Question #2

Are you going to travel with this camera ?

Pictures of a camera don’t tell us much about its actual dimensions. And I’m going to assume that nobody reads those dimension specs at the bottom of the list.

If your camera is going to be a travel camera (i.e. used mostly when you are far away from home, be inside your carry-on baggage) it should be small. I mean it should be as small and as lightweight as it is possible without sacrificing necessary features.

My advice here is to pick a camera with a crop sensor. They tend to be smaller and weigh less. It usually says “APS-C” in the specs (but Nikon prefers to list it as “DX-Format”. Okay Nikon…Jeez)

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Question #3

Is an interchangeable lens camera really necessary ?

Don’t get me wrong, I’m all about those nice and beautiful lenses, but you can save a lot of cash by not opting for this kind of camera.

Today there are plenty of compact cameras that can do wonders for you: shoot a vlog for YouTube ? Easy.. Take a pic for your insta ? Double easy..

To top this off, those cameras fit in your pocket and weigh absolutely nothing, when it comes to traveling.

Still confused ?

I’ll help you make the right choice.

Want to buy a new camera or a lens ? I’ll be your virtual shopping assistant.

Types of lenses explained

This is the 2nd part of my Introduction to lenses article and if you haven’t yet read it, you can find it here:

Introduction to Lenses (DSLR and Mirrorless)

Right now you are lost because it’s your first digital camera with a kit lens and you want to buy a new and better lens for it OR you don’t even have a camera yet.

This is where you should be careful. Lenses and cameras are not cheap, and you don’t want to make a bad choice here. So let’s dive right in…

As we have already established these are the types of lenses that you can buy right now (with sample images):

Photo by Simon Berger on Pexels.com

Standard lenses

Those are the most popular lenses among the beginner photographers. They can be used in almost any situation. They are a bit less expensive compared to wide and telephoto lenses. Also a go-to lens for traveling.

Photo by Tuu1ea5n Kiu1ec7t Jr. on Pexels.com

Telephoto lenses

These lenses have a more narrow angle of view which helps isolate the subject from the unnecessary details. Can be used for portraits + blurs the background beautifully.

Photo by Aleksandar Pasaric on Pexels.com

Wide angle lenses

From extreme wide to medium wide angles. Primarily used to show the environment as wide as possible: landscapes, nature, city etc. Almost never used for portraits.

Photo by Jack Bulmer on Pexels.com

Super Telephoto lenses

These are used mainly by sports and wildlife photographers. They “shoot” farther which helps focus on a little bird far far away or on a football player somewhere across the field. Very bulky and extremely expensive.

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There are of course a couple other types of lenses. They are so called “special” types: Macro lenses and Fisheye lenses.

Photo by Caio on Pexels.com

Macro lenses

Those lenses allow you to get reeeeally close to your subject. Best used to take a pic of something tiny, like flowers or insects. But actually macro lenses are sometimes used for food photography or even portraiture.

Photo by Jan Kopu0159iva on Pexels.com

Fisheye lenses

Super wide angle (a.k.a. Fisheye) lenses distort everything but it actually looks really cool in some situations.

One last thing.. All of those types of lenses can have a fixed or variable focal length (Primes vs Zooms). Zooms are very versatile but primes tend to be sharper and have lower aperture (even F/0.95!!!!!)

Still confused ?

I’ll help you make the right choice.

Want to buy a new camera or a lens ? I’ll be your virtual shopping assistant.

Introduction to Lenses (DSLR and Mirrorless)

Hi! How are you ? I hope you’re okay 🙂 Today I’m going to introduce you to all types of lenses and hopefully help you make a good purchasing decision. This article is aimed mostly at folks who are not that photo gear savvy, so I’m keeping it basic.

Right now you are lost because it’s your first digital camera with a kit lens and you want to buy a new and better lens for it OR you don’t even have a camera yet. This is where you should be careful. Lenses and cameras are not cheap, and you don’t want to make a bad choice here. So let’s dive right in…

Lens Mount

Lenses are things that attach to your camera (duh…), but the way they attach is important. If you try to attach a lens to a camera body with different mount you can easily break both your lens and camera.

Some of the most popular attachment types or bayonets you might see right now are:

  • RF mount (Canon R)
  • Fujifilm X mount
  • Nikon Z mount (Or older F mount)
  • Sony E (or NEX)
  • etc.

This is reeeeeeeeeally simple.

Just look at your camera’s specs and look for “lens mount type” or “lens attachment”. Then just buy a lens with the same mount.

See ? Easy 😀

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Sensor coverage

Now that’s a little more tricky. Stick with me… Not every lens fits every sensor size. Which brings us to sensor sizes…

Today most common sensor sizes are (from biggest to smallest):

  • Full frame (35mm film equivalent);
  • APS-C or Crop sensor (35mm divided by the crop factor which is specific for every camera brand);
  • MFT or Micro 4/3

So before buying a lens, dig through the specs and find out, does it cover a full frame or crop or 4/3 sensor.

That is cruicial. Because if you buy a lens made for crop sensor and take a pic on a full frame camera, this will happen:

Lens types

This is where everything goes to hell 😀 Arguments about which focal length is made for what, which lens is a portrait lens and blah blah…

But for now, let me just roughly explain what is what.

All lenses have two major parameters by which they are most often compared: Widest F-stop and focal length.

F-Stop – is an indication of how wide the aperture can become in order to let in more light. This is all you need to know as a beginner. Some F-stop numbers that you might see: 1.4 / 1.8 / 2.8 / 4 / 5.6 and so on. But remember that the lower the F-stop the higher the price..

Focal length – is basically how wide the angle of view of a particular lens is. I know that it’s not a correct definition… okaaaaay… Focal length is an optical distance from the point where light rays converge to form a sharp image of an object to the digital sensor or 35mm film at the focal plane in the camera. There… happy ? Complicated.

This is what it looks like:

Another point I want to mention here: focal length AND the F-stop number can be fixed or variable. So if you see a 70-200mm lens with F/4 then you’ll know that the field of view of this lens can be either a bit wider (70mm) or very narrow (200mm) and it’s lowest F/4 can be acheived on both ends.

Another example: 16-50mm F/3.5-F/5.6 means that it can go reeeeeeeeealy wide to a bit narrower 50mm (which is close to what a human eye can see) with a variable f-stop (F/3.5 at 16 mm and F/5.6 at 50mm).

Lenses with fixed focal length are called Primes and lenses with variable focal length are called zooms.

Finally… All that info was needed for you to understand what types of lenses mean what. They are:

  • Wide angle (Somewhere between 16mm-24mm);
  • Standard (24mm – 50mm roughly);
  • Telephoto (70mm-200mm);
  • Super telephoto (300mm – 600mm).

And they all can be either primes or zooms (24mm prime or 70-300mm zoom).

Autofocus or Manual focus

This is simple. If you want the lens to do all the focusing for you then make sure to grab the one with autofocus otherwise with manual focus. Sounds easy right ?.. not exactly…

If your camera is made by Sony and you want to buy a lens by, let’s say Sigma… will it have autofocus ? Maybe.. Because there are still lenses that are manual focus only. Be careful when buying a lens made NOT by the same manufacturer as your camera.

The safest bet would be: buy both, camera and lens from the same manufacturer and everything will be awesome.

Things you should not care about, as a beginner:

  • Filter thread sizes;
  • Elements and groups (you might see those in lens’s specs);
  • Minimum focus distance (unless you’re shooting macro);

Cool bonus features:

  • Image stabilization;

So that concludes my intro to lenses for beginners. Thank you all very much for reading this. I hope I helped you in any way to make and informed choice.

👇 I will assemble a photography kit tailored to your needs and budget. Book a buying consultation below! 👇

Still confused ?

I’ll help you make the right choice.

Want to buy a new camera or a lens ? I’ll be your virtual shopping assistant.